Visiting New Hampshire's Biodiversity


Devils Hopyard



Description:
In this boulder-strewn ravine you’ll find an exemplary spruce - moss wooded talus community, in addition to scenery dramatically different from all that surrounds it. Starting off in mixed northern hardwood forest, the trail takes a turn and leads up into the dark, narrow gorge where spruce and fir trees dominate the tree canopy and feathery mosses grow in wild abundance. Listen for the roaring sound of the stream below the boulders along the steeper pitches. Near the upper limit of this lush ravine, a seepy, vertical cliff blocks the path to the left, and you can see the steeper talus slope in the woods off to the right. The trail dead ends just beyond this point.


Directions: Start at the South Pond Recreation area off of Rte. 110 (a day-use area in the White Mountain National Forest; there is a small parking fee). Take the Kilkenny Ridge Trail south from the beach area for about 0.7 miles through mixed hardwood forest, then take a right on the Devil’s Hopyard Trail. After crossing the stream, the route bears right up into the ravine. Follow for about a mile up into the conifer-dominated, boulder-strewn gorge. The trail ends near the top of the ravine - retrace your hike from here. 

Landowner:
White Mountain National Forest

Images (hold mouse over image for caption)

The sylvan brook at the lower end of the Devil's Hopyard ravine (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) Moss-covered boulders in the cold-air talus forest (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) Base of a seepy cliff near the upper end of Devil's Hopyard (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

Trailhead at the South Pond Recreation Area beach (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) Upper end of the Devil's Hopyard Trail (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

Clintonia borealis (blue-bead lily) in bloom along the trail in Devil's Hopyard (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) Oxalis montana (northern wood sorrel) in bloom along the trail to Devil's Hopyard (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) The Devil's Hopyard Trail takes you through an exemplary mossy cold-air variant of the spruce- birch - mountain maple talus forest community (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

All of the primary species in the mossy cold-air variant of the spruce- birch - mountain maple talus forest community (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) Mossy talus boulder with Hylocomium splendens (stairstep moss) (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

Hiking through Devil's Hopyard (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

The cliff seep near the top end of the Devil's Hopyard Trail (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) A Coptis trifolia (goldthread)-covered mossy boulder (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

at the lower end of the Devil's Hopyard ravine (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

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